Archive for the ‘Organization’ Category

17 Organization Tips

Monday, January 2nd, 2017

17-organization-tips

Today I’m going to share with you 17 organization tips that will help you to maintain an organized house:

Organization Tip #1: Get rid of as much stuff as possible. Make yourself a goal of filling up 10 boxes to take to Goodwill (or 3 boxes, or whatever).

organization-tips

Organization Tip #2: Use small open boxes to organize art supplies in a drawer.

organize-markers

Organization Tip #3: Changing your cupboard liner can give your cupboard a fresh new look.

cupboard-liner

Organization Tip #4: Making a list of to-do’s the night before will make you more productive the next day.

Organization Tip #5: Do the hardest thing on your list first. Then you will feel relieved and have energy to do the rest.

Organization Tip #6: I saw a shelf on a wall at a bed and breakfast last year, with large hooks underneath. I would love to put one in my bathroom to put towels and bathrobes on. (Great use of wall space!)

organized-robes

Organization Tip #7: Contain toys in bins. My newest bin is the nerf bin.

nerf-bin

Organization Tip #8: Instead of fumbling with mismatched food containers, get a set that stacks. It takes up way less space in your cupboard, and it looks neater in your refrigerator.

organize-with-tupperware

Organization Tip #9: Use a fishing tackle box to organize toys with small parts.

organize-with-tackle-box

Organization Tip #10: Eat protein in the morning. You will be a lot more productive with what you want to accomplish.

great-breakfast

Organization Tip #11: My husband likes collecting Wii games for the kids. Pretty soon Wii stuff was all over the living room. I decided to organize all the games and accessories in a drawer under the TV. You could also store it all in a basket beside the couch.

organizing-wii

Organization Tip #12: Roll up your jeans to fit more in your drawer. Find out more ways to organize your bedroom here.

roll-your-jeans

Organization Tip #13: Always look for furniture with built-in storage space. Find out how to organize a window seat here.

window-storage

Organization Tip #14: If you use something with small drawers for craft supplies, make sure that all your kids are above age 4. Otherwise the buttons (or whatever) will end up all over the floor. For younger children, I recommend a tackle box, which I show you in my “Organizing for a Fun Homeschool” video.

little-drawers

Organization Tip #15: If you place all the mittens and snow caps in a drawer from oldest to youngest in your family, everyone will be able to find theirs when heading out the door for some fun sledding.

mitten-drawer

Organization Tip #16: Go through your DVD’s and only keep the ones you absolutely love. Store the remaining ones in a drawer near the TV.

organize-DVDs

Organization Tip #17: My daughter loves a wooden tool caddie loaded with her favorite art supplies.

art-caddy

For more tips on organizing your house, check out my organization products.

High School Homeschool Curriculum

Friday, September 2nd, 2016

high-school-homeschool-curriculum

If you are wondering what we are doing for our high school homeschool curriculum this year, you have come to the right place. Today I will be sharing what we plan to use this year for our high school students.

Homeschool Math

We are using Teaching Textbooks, and my oldest two sons (16 and 14) are taking Pre-Calculus. My third son (13) is taking Algebra 2, and my 11-year-old daughter is taking Pre-Algebra. I love this program because I don’t have anything to grade, and I don’t have to teach the material. This is especially important with Pre-Calculus, since I have never taken it in my life!

Homeschool Language Arts

homeschool-language-artsThis post contains affiliate links.

We are focusing on SAT preparation this year, so we are pulling material from these three sources:

I will not be doing every page from the above books, but I will pull the most helpful bits out to strengthen any weaknesses uncovered by the practice SAT tests. We will be doing a lot of essay writing as well, to make sure they are fully prepared for college.

I’m planning to teach Logic to my oldest two sons, to help them in answering questions from the Reading and Writing sections of the test. I will probably do it after finishing Economics, since both Logic and Economics are half-year courses. (Introductory Logic by Douglas Wilson with videos by James B. Nance.)

Homeschool Economics

homeschool-economics

Instead of history this year, we will be learning about Economics. Here are the books and materials we will be using:

We will also be watching John Stossel DVD’s, which I ordered for free from his website. You can also watch episodes from his program (which used to air on 20/20) straight from his website.

For 12 weeks: We will be watching the 20-min. video of Economics for Everybody on Monday nights, followed by discussion questions. Then we will read one chapter from the Basic Economics textbook and answer those discussion questions. Wednesday night we will read another chapter and answer the discussion questions. I wanted my husband to be a part of the class because he is more in touch with current events and how they relate to economics.

There are 12 segments on Economics for Everybody, and each week we cover two chapters from the textbook. The kids will read Honest Money on their own during reading time.

Homeschool Science

My oldest two sons have already taken Biology, Chemistry, and Human Anatomy, and we filmed everything we did. These videos are inside the Unit Study Treasure Vault and are well worth the low cost of joining the site just for those high school science videos. Next year we will be doing Marine Biology and filming everything.

My youngest two have not taken Biology yet, so they will be taking it this year. It is a prerequisite for Marine Biology next year, which all four of my kids will be taking.

My older two will graduate next year with a phenomenal education including Shakespeare, great works of literature, theology of the Old and New Testaments, creative writing, classical art, etc. Because we do not do Junior High, we do six years of high school, so that we have school days that end by lunch–and we actually enjoy our lives!

Homeschool Spanish

We did a year of Rosetta Stone during the summer. This coming school year we will do Years 2 & 3, and the following year we will do Years 4 & 5. I am fluent in Spanish, so I plan to do some fun field trips and activities to go along with our study. I would love to visit Guatemala where I grew up to show my kids what it’s like to live in a third-world country.

Homeschool Art

homeschool-art

We have been doing a class called Mixing with the Masters, and we will complete the class this fall. There are six famous artists with three art projects per artist for a grand total of 18 finished art projects. We are using this class for high school art credit, and we are learning a lot about the techniques of the great artists.

Homeschool Bible

Every year we read through the entire Bible on audio while eating breakfast. Earlier in 2016, we filmed unit studies of I & II Thessalonians all the way to Revelation. These included skits and other hands-on activities that brought the books to life. They are all accessible in the Bible section of the Vault.

Over the summer I read the following books:

  • Because the Time is Near: John MacArthur explains the Book of Revelation (We compared his pre-trib stance with John Piper’s post-trib stance and saw that there were LOTS of Scriptures that go against pre-tribulation rapture.)
  • Foxe’s Book of Martyrs (This is gory, but I am preparing my children to be martyrs. I am teaching them to stand for their faith in the face of the persecution that is coming.)
  • Heaven by Joni Erickson Tada (because all that butchery and death from Foxe’s Book of Martyrs is too much to bear without the clear vision of heaven, which is where all wrongs will be made right and there will be no more suffering or sorrow.)

We also learned note-taking skills at church. Because of reading the three books listed above, we are behind in our yearly Bible reading and will need to boogy to get it done by the end of December!

Oh, and my kids are watching this series for Bible class as well: The Bible Project. These videos are the books of the Bible explained in chart form in about 10 minutes with drawings. Phenomenal.

PE is hiking and swimming and bicycling.

That’s it.

Linking up to Curriculum Week at iHomeschool Network.

How to Organize Recipes

Monday, December 29th, 2014

how-to-organize-recipes

In this video, I show you how to organize recipes: the demonstration includes binders, boxes, and some of my favorite children’s cookbooks. My daughter loves to cook and wants to start her own recipe collection.

If your recipe cards are jammed and you can’t pull out a card without pulling out a whole section of cards, it’s time to re-organize your recipes. One way you can do this is to get a specially designed recipe binder that is similar to a photo album, but it has dividers for breads, meats, desserts, and other common categories you would find in a cookbook. You can get these recipe binders in most book stores or online.

recipe-organization

If you are low on money and want to create your own binder, all you need is a three-ring binder and some plastic sheet protectors. The thing I love about this way of organizing recipes is that you can tear out a recipe page from your favorite magazine and slide the whole page into the sheet protector. You might want to have a recipe binder like this in addition to your recipe box or whatever other method you use for organizing your recipes.

I showed you some of my favorite children’s cookbooks in the video, and the reason I love these cookbooks is that they are addressed to children and easy for children to use. If you can get your children to enjoy cooking at a young age, you will be instilling skills that will help them to survive for the rest of their lives!

If you enjoyed this video on how to organize recipes, you will love Organizing for a Fun Homeschool.

The-Homeschool-Mothers-Journal-300x300-Square

Creating a Homeschool Schedule

Wednesday, February 12th, 2014

creating-a-homeschool-schedule

Do you need help creating a homeschool schedule?

Yesterday I participated in a panel with several homeschooling parents, where we discussed many topics related to creating a schedule for your homeschool. What are the pros and cons of loose and rigid schedules? How do you create a schedule that works for you? What does your schedule look like, and why do you do it that way? How do you even begin to organize your day as a homeschool mom?

Here is the video panel workshop, answering all these questions:

My biggest secret for creating a homeschool schedule:

The biggest secret for how I get done the things that matter in homeschooling and in life is this: I pray about each activity and ask God what I should be doing, and what I shouldn’t be doing. I prioritize what’s important, and I don’t do every activity that comes along.

My current homeschool schedule:

Almost everything I’m doing right now for homeschooling revolves around the Bible. We are filming the entire Bible, brought to life in skits and hands-on activities, from Genesis to Revelation, to put into the Bible section of the Vault. We are also doing Earth and Space by Bright Ideas Press, and we are filming what we are doing as we blog about it. That’s all we have time for. (We did a full year of history last semester.) The kids get their math done first thing in the morning, then we have Bible class (includes writing, art, reading, and history), then we do hands-on science. After this we have lunch, then silent reading for an hour. This is what our schedule looks like right now.

8:00 am–Breakfast
8:30 am–Math
10:00 am–Bible class
11 am–Science class
12 noon–lunch & silent reading

More schedule-related articles, videos, and workshops I’ve done in the past, that can give you some ideas for creating a homeschool schedule:

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